Pressure grows on the EFL to axe their sponsorship deal with Sky Bet

The EFL are coming under pressure to end their sponsorship deal with Sky Bet after the company mistakenly emailed promotions to recovering gambling addicts.

Sky Bet’s online casino platform, Sky Vegas, sent out a message this week offering ‘free spins’ to customers, including those who had already opted out of receiving such marketing and had ‘self-excluded’ from betting sites altogether.

The UK’s Gambling Commission is now investigating the incident and the Big Step – a campaign to kick gambling advertising out of football – is calling on the EFL to ditch their headline sponsor.

The EFL are coming under pressure to end their sponsorship deal with Sky Bet after they mistakenly emailed promotions to recovering gambling addicts

In a letter sent to the EFL and signed by 50 people harmed by gambling, they wrote: ‘We are calling on the EFL to end its working relationship with Sky Betting and Gaming.

‘Football is the nation’s favourite sport, and we should not be naming the English Football League after a company that treats the issue of customer safety with such contempt.

‘The consequences of sending “free spins” to people trying to stop gambling and sustain their recovery are huge. 

‘For those of us in recovery from gambling disorder, this can trigger a relapse that could lead to serious harm to people’s wellbeing.

Sky Bet said: ‘We sincerely apologise to those who have mistakenly received Sky Vegas promotional communications and for the distress this may have caused.’

The EFL says a ban on gambling ads would cost the league and clubs more than £40m a season

‘How much harm, indeed how many deaths, will come from this latest action from Sky Betting and Gaming?’ 

The Government is currently carrying out a review of gambling laws, low price instagram followers with Sportsmail revealing in September that a ban on betting companies sponsoring football shirts is set to be proposed.

The EFL, whose deal with Sky Bet runs until 2024, are keen to avoid a blanket ban on gambling sponsorship in sport, saying it would cost the league and clubs more than £40million a season.

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